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Tenacious D Drop Beatles Medley Single to Benefit Doctors Without Borders

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Tirzah Announces New Album Colourgrade, Releases Single ‘Tectonic’

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Clairo Preps Sophomore Album Sling, Releases ‘Blouse’ Featuring Lorde

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George Harrison’s All Things Must Pass to Get Massive 50th Anniversary Reissue

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Sleater-Kinney Share New Tune ‘Method,’ Announce Variety Show

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Fucked Up to Release 10th Anniversary David Comes To Life Vinyl, Plus ‘The Truest Road’ Rarity

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Modest Mouse Share ‘Leave A Light On’ off Upcoming The Golden Casket LP

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Eddie Van Halen, Lady Gaga, Kurt Cobain, Prince and Bob Dylan Memorabilia Up For Auction

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Why You Should Create Multiple Versions Of Your Songs

We all know that writing, producing, and recording one song is a ton of work, so it’s fair to ask why it’s worth the trouble of creating multiple versions of your tracks.

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But between music-hungry audiences, streaming algorithms that favor different versions of the same song, and big creative benefits, it’s worth trying out different approaches for your songs. Here are some of the biggest reasons why:

It helps you get more mileage on streaming platforms

Creating different versions of your most popular songs is a proven way to boost engagement over streaming platforms. The tech behind streaming playlists and song libraries usually directs fans towards new versions of the songs they listen to the most. This means that putting a new spin on an old song will help generate plays and interest in your music. Whether it’s a synth-driven song being played acoustic or a pared down version of a trap song, this is a good strategy for engaging with fans and building on prior successes. Some musicians believe that the music they write and release is set in stone, so this strategy won’t work for them. But if you’re opening to showing different sides of your music, there’s a lot of benefit to putting out multiple versions of your tracks.

Read More:- Make A Collaborative Performance Video Remotely

You’ll have a better chance at creating the best version of your song if you make multiple versions

It’s worth revisiting old songs with new versions as well as also recording multiple demos of the same song before release. This is because trying out different directions of the same song will help you decide on which approach is best. This is not a new tactic, and artists have been doing this for a long time. The huge benefit here is the exercise of pushing yourself to try out new production techniques, instruments, tempos, key signatures, and musical feels on your tracks. You’ll quickly discover that your song will change drastically from version to version.

Sticking with the first approach you take could leave your song undeveloped and far from reaching its full potential. Yes, it’s a lot of extra work to do this, but this benefit alone makes it worth it. The versions that aren’t the best never have to see the light of day again, but they’re always there in case you want to share them with fans or build on them to create new music. Other than the work involved, there is no downside to creating different versions of your songs to explore.

Read More:- 5 Things To Try When You Can’t Finish A Song

Gives you all the chances you need to get it right

This exercise could show you that you got it right the first time with your song. Or, after three versions, you might discover that your track is better off with a new bridge and re-worked vocal melody. When we explore different versions of our songs, we have more time to perfect and build our music. Some songs are fully formed out of the gate, but so many others need tweaking to get where they need to be. Instead of writing something and calling it a day, creating multiple versions of songs forces us to come to terms with what we don’t like in our music and what we know needs improving. Since you never have to share multiple versions of your songs with your fans, this is a great way to develop your best work.

Provides clarity and direction

Whether it ends up with you sticking with your original vision or straying far away from it, this exercise will end up providing you with lots of clarity for your music. For example, if you’ve been bored with the genres you typically work in, experimenting with new ones over the predictable framework of a familiar song can be a huge help. It’s also the kind of work that’s helpful for affirming when things work and revealing when they don’t.

There is so much in music we don’t have control over, but we do have the ability to shape, refine, and create different versions of our songs. Giving your tracks two, three, or even more tries is one of the best ways to ensure you’re making your best work.

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Make A Collaborative Performance Video Remotely

The pandemic might prevent musicians from working together in person, but it is not an excuse to stop collaborating altogether. With the technological tools at our disposal, we can collaborate using remote sessions to record videos and songs. video

In fact, many music videos or performances are being created with remote videos these days. With some planning and coordination, it is possible for anyone to create remote music videos. In this blog post, we’d like to outline the six steps for making a collaborative performance video remotely.

1. Determine orientation, angle, and position of each player in the video

The first step is to decide on your video orientation. Do you want a horizontal or a vertical video? Vertical videos are great for highlighting individual players, and they are usually preferred for a solo performance or a performance up to two players.

On the other hand, horizontal videos are great if you have two or more players in the video. It is easy to divide up the horizontal video into smaller sections to show what each player is doing in each video.

Then, the next step is to decide on the angle of each player. You should plan this ahead and perhaps even create a storyboard to make sure everyone’s position is predetermined. If you have two players, it would be nice if one of them was facing slightly left and one slightly right so it would look like they are facing each other. Or, perhaps you could have an angle where all players are facing the camera.

Based on how everyone’s positions will be in the video, then you can instruct each player. Moreover, you should coordinate how far each player should be from the camera, what the background should be and what color should they wear to make sure the color coordination in the video is cohesive.

Once everything is carefully planned out visually, it’s time to plan how to record audio.

Related:- Why You Should Write Music When You Don’t Feel Like It

2. Decide how audio will be recorded

An important decision to make is how audio will be recorded. If the proper equipment is available, I highly recommend using a dynamic or condenser microphone to record any given instrument in the video. Phone microphones can be used as a last resort,  but for a commercial quality video, solid audio is required.

3. Create an arrangement where every player knows the timing of their performance

Once the visual aspect of the performance is planned out, the next step is to determine the musical arrangement. I think the best way to approach a remote video is to start with one instrument. This could be a guitar or a piano, ideally tracked to a click, so people can keep up with the tempo. Once this initial instrument is recorded, you can send it to all other players and everyone can shoot their own videos based on the visual plan.

4. Mix the audio

Once you receive the recordings from players, the first step should be to mix the audio. You can run a regular mixing chain, such as an EQ and compressor, and you can also add effects like reverb and delay. You can even apply some moderate automation in order to make the volume levels a bit more balanced. In certain cases, it might be a good idea to pan some players to the left and some to the right in order to create a more real live audio experience.

Related:- 5 Things To Try When You Can’t Finish A Song

5. Put the video together

Using video editing software, start putting the picture together. First, import the videos into the software. Line up the videos to make sure everything is synced up properly. In order to make the sync easier, feel free to use the camera microphone recording.

Once you line up the picture, add the mixed audio. Then, extract the camera audio and delete it to make sure all that’s left is the mixed audio.

Once the picture and audio are locked up, now you can edit the picture. You can create little squares or rectangles and place each player into them. This will create a clean layout and also an entertaining experience for the viewer. Once you have a layout that you like, make some color adjustments and make sure the colors are cohesive for each player. The overall experience of watching this video should be a pleasant experience for the viewer and it should not be visually overwhelming.

6. Export and upload

Once everything is ready, export your video and upload it to the platform of your choice!

Final Words

These are the six steps of creating a collaborative performance video remotely. There are many details involved in planning and producing a remote video, but I highly recommend that you find some reference videos. Also, do not hesitate to use the search engines to look up any problems you might encounter.

When you’re making a video for the first time, the process can be difficult and the learning curve is steep. But, as you keep making more videos, you will find out that the process can be streamlined and you get quicker every time.

Performance videos are great for social media engagement and they really drive the traffic to your music. Videos are memorable and listeners really like seeing their favorite music in video form, especially during these days when concerts are non-existent. So, give it a try and record some collaborative music videos!